Richard Pask At Home

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Grandmaster Pask in his Library

At the end of May of this year (2017) your editor had the great pleasure of visiting with Mr. Richard Pask and family at his home in the town of Chickerell, in Weymouth, on England's southern coast. Mr. and Mrs. Pask, and their son Robert, are delightful and hospitable people, and it was a very memorable visit indeed.

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Mrs. Pask's English Garden

Mrs. Pask, a musician and teacher, is also a talented gardener and keeps a wonderful English garden, the likes of which are seen only in movies.

Of course, we talked checkers, and Mr. Pask showed us through his library (shown above), packed with checker literature and checker memorablia. Our discussions ranged far and wide, continuing over dinner at a traditional English pub, The Turk's Head.

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Mrs. Pask, your Editor, and Mr. Pask

We asked Mr. Pask to tell us of his favorite personal game, and he said it came from the 1985 Scottish Open, where Mr. Pask had the White against Danny Shields with the Black.


1. 10-14 24-19
2. 7-10 27-24
3. 9-13

A likely loss (already)! 11-15 or 11-16 would have been correct. Mr. Pask points out that this position can also arise from the opening sequence 1. 9-13 23-19; 2. 10-14 27-23; 3. 7-10?.


3. ... 22-18
4. 11-15 18x11
5. 8x15 24-20

26-22 instead keeps the advantage.


6. 15x24 28x19

The game has now reverted to a probable draw, although the actual play could be difficult over the board.


7. 4-8 25-22
8. 2-7

Probably loses. 8-11 would be a narrow draw.


8. ... 22-18
9. 14-17 21x14
10. 10x17 18-15
11. 5-9 29-25
12. 6-10

9-14 was better; Black is surely lost.

BLACK
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WHITE
White to Play and Win

W:W32,31,30,26,25,23,20,19,15:B17,13,12,10,9,8,7,3,1.

Grandmaster Pask was able to find the win in this position. Can you? We'd rate this one as about medium in difficulty; a little effort will be rewarded. See how you do and then click on Read More to see the solution.null



Solution


12. ... 15x6
13. 1x10 25-22
14. 8-11 32-28
15. 17-21 22-18
16. 10-15

16. 10-15 is the computer's chosen move. Over the board the actual game continued instead 16. 3-8 26-22; 17. 10-14 19-15; 18. 14-17 15-10!; 19. 7-14 31-26; 20. 12-16 28-24; 21. 8-12 24-19. White wins.


15. ... 19x10
17. 7x14 28-24
18. 14-17 31-27

Black can do nothing against the threat of 18-15. White wins.

Some day we hope to return the Pask family's hospitality should they visit Hawai`i during Mr. Pask's retirement.

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Mrs.Pask, Mr. Pask, and Robert Pask at Mr. Pask's Retirement

08/26/17 - Category: Games - Printer friendly version
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