The Checker Maven

An Exercise in Technique

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The great guitarist Andres Segovia once said, in effect, that technique either advances or retreats; it never stays the same. Of course, he was talking about the classical guitar, but the same applies to the game of checkers. We need to constantly strive to improve our technique and not allow it to slip back.

In today's Checker School entry, we divert briefly from our "gem" problems and present an exercise in endgame technique. It's a bit on the long side, but it's very instructive.

BLACK
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WHITE
White to Play and Win

W:WK15,K20,K28,K30:B5,K27,K29,K32.

White has a win on the board; that's probably obvious to the experienced eye. But the win takes patience and the skilled application of technique. Can you find the winning path? It's well worth your time and effort; do give it a solid try before you click on Read More to see the details.null



Solution


1. ... 28-24
2. 27-31 20-16
3. 32-28 16-19
4. 28-32 24-28
5. 31-27 15-18
6. 27-31 19-15
7. 31-27 18-22
8. 27-31 15-18

White, having gotten one of his kings into the double corner, slowly tightens the position.


9. 31-27 22-26
10. 27-31 18-22
11. 31-27 26-31
12. 27-23 22-26
13. 23-18 26-22
14. 18x25 30x21
15. 5-9

Black must now move his single man, the beginning of the end for him.


15. ... 31-26
16. 32-27 26-22
17. 27-23 21-17
18. 23-19 22-18
19. 29-25 17-13

White Wins. A very fine exercise, sent along by regular contributors Josh and Lloyd Gordon of Toronto.

05/18/19 - Category: Problems - Printer friendly version
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