The Checker Maven

Solve This, Not That

20140816-bellcresswell.jpg

In today's Checker School column, it looks like there are two problems, and that's sort of true; what happens is that the first problem evolves into the second. So you might be well advised to take on the second problem first, and then go back and see how the first problem can indeed become the second.

Confusing? Just take our word for it and solve the problems in reverse order.

S. S. BELL
WHITE
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BLACK
Black to Play and Win

B:W26,23,21,20,19:B12,11,10,9,3.

E. E. CRESSWELL
WHITE
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BLACK
Black to Play and Win

B:W26,25,21,20,16:B14,8,7,5,3.

What's fascinating about this is that at a quick glance, the first problem actually looks like it might be simpler!

Solve one or both, or neither(!) as your inclination and checker prowess allow, but definitely click on Read More to see the solutions, detailed notes, and a sample game.20050904-symbol.gif



Solutions

Solutions, sample game, and lettered notes are from Ben Boland's Famous Positions in the Game of Checkers. Numbered notes are by the editor, using the KingsRow computer engine and 10-piece endgame database.

Bell: 11-15, 19-16, 12-19, 23-16, 15-18---1 16-11, 10-15. Same as Cresswell at S.

Cresswell: 5-9, 25-22, 8-11---A, 22-17---B, 11-15, 17-10, 7-14, 16-11, 14-18---S, 20-16---2, 15-19, 16-12, 9-13, 11-8, 18-23, 26-22, 23-26, 22-18, 26-30, 8-4---C,3, 30-26, 4-8, 26-23, 18-15, 23-18, 8-11---D, 3-7, 11-2, 18-11, 2-6, 19-23, 6-10, 23-26, 10-14, 26-30, 14-18, 30-25. Now if white plays 18-14 we have a first position ending---4, and 18-23 is second position---5. Black wins.

Game: 10-15, 23-19, 7-10, 22-18, 15-22, 25-18, 9-14, 18-9, 5-14, 29-25, 11-15, 25-22, 6-9, 27-23, 8-11, 24-20, 15-24, 28-19, 11-15, 32-28, 15-24, 28-19, 4-8, 22-18, 8-11, 19-15, 10-19, 23-7, 14-23, 26-19, 2-11, 30-26, 1-6---F, 26-23, 6-10, 31-26---E. Forms above position, by S. S. Bell. A. J. Mantell vs. M. E. Keating, game No. 4011, "Roseville Citizen," Dec. 17, 1936.

A---This corrects Problem No. 16 by E. Ebert in A. Reisman's, "The Pioneer System," where 9-13 is played allowing a draw.

B---16-12, 11-15, 22-17, 15-19. Black wins as in trunk.

C---18-15, 30-26, 15-10, 26-23, 10-6, 23-18, 6-1, 19-23, 8-4, 23-26, 4-8, 18-15. Black wins.

D---15-10, 18-15. Black wins as in Note C.

E---Here 23-18, 12-16, 19-12, 10-14, 18-15, Etc. Draws. A. J. M.

F---If 9-14, 26-23, 1-6, 31-26, 6-9, 26-22, 3-7, 22-18, 7-10, and now we have the "Lucus Position." White wins by 20-16, 11-20, 18-15, etc. See the "Lucus-Mullholland Position."

1---10-14 also wins.

2---White can try 21-17 here but it also loses in a similar manner.

3---The computer chooses 18-15 here, but Black's winning procedure is still similar.

4---18-14 25-22 14-10 22-26 10-14 26-23 14-10 23-19 10-14 19-15 14-9 15-18 9-5 18-14 5-1 13-17 etc., to a 1st Position win.

5---18-23 25-22 23-19 22-26 19-24 26-23 24-28 23-19 28-32 19-24 32-28 11-16 28x19 16x23 12-8 23-18 8-3 13-17 21x14 18x9 Black Wins.

The above position by S. S. Bell may be found as No. 133 in J. M. Duffy's "Standard Positions," Part 2.

Cresswell's position may be found colors reversed as Gem No. 893, "Draughts World," Vol. 40, 1912. This in turn was taken from "Nottinghamshire Guardian," No. 2456.

11/15/14 - Category: Books - Printer friendly version
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