The Checker Maven

A Grand Rapids 4th

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Once again, we take the annual opportunity to remark that as unabashed and unapologetic patriots we greatly enjoy celebrating the 4th of July holiday. For us, that celebration always includes the publication of a fine checker problem by an American composer.

A little while back, we discovered the astonishing work of late 19th century checkerist O. H. Richmond, of Grand Rapids, Michigan (an all-American town if there ever was one, as the photo above illustrates). Today we're pleased to present another of Mr. Richmond's fine problems with the hope that you will enjoy it as much as we did.

BLACK
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WHITE
White to Play and Win

W:W5,21,30,31:B6,9,K13,28.

Join us in including checkers in your 4th of July festivities. Solve the problem, and then click on Read More to see the solution.20050904-symbol.gif



Solution

5-1 6-10 1-6 10-15---A 6-10 15-19 10-15 19-24 15-19 9-14 30-26 13-9 26-23 9-6 23-18 14x23 19x26 6-10 21-17 28-32 26-23---B 10-6 17-13 6-1 13-9 1-5 9-6 5-1 6-2 1-5 23-19 24-28 19-23 5-9 2-7 9-14 31-26---C 14-9 7-10 9-5 26-22 5-9 22-18 9-5 18-14 5-1 14-9 1-5 10-14 5-1 9-5 White Wins--D.

A---10-14 30-26 28-32 26-22 32-28 6-10 14-18 22x15 White Wins.

B---White has now achieved the desired position with one White king holding two White pieces at bay.

C---White now brings his free man into play.

D---The rest is mere routine. We admire the way White patiently pursued the win, making a series of forcing moves that created the envisioned "one holds two" position which so often leads to victory. If you solved this one without moving the pieces, you have great depth to your "checker vision."

And now, back to the celebration! Happy birthday, America!

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06/30/12 - Category: Problems - Printer friendly version
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