The Checker Maven

Reed's Delayed Brooklyn

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The Brooklyn Bridge is certainly a New York City icon, famed in poem, song, and urban legend. You probably are wondering about our title, which contains the words "Delayed Brooklyn"; more typical for New York would be "Brooklyn Delay" as many a rush-hour traffic jam plays itself out every week, if not every day, on the Brooklyn Bridge.

But in today's installment from the classic Willie Ryan book Tricks Traps & Shots of the Checkerboard we'll find out just what "Reed's Delayed Brooklyn" is all about. Let's hear it in Willie's own words.

"The following brilliant crossboard game was contested by James P. Reed and Alfred Jordan when Reed visited the British Isles many years ago to do battle with the leading boardsmen in John Bull's domain. When the diagrammed situation was reached, Jordan continued 21-17 and had to give up soon thereafter. When the game was over, the brilliant Pittsburgher astonished Jordan, as well as the gallery, by pointing out how Jordan could have drawn by a delayed form of the Brooklyn shot. We consider this one of the finest and most deceptive examples of the Brooklyn in embryo:


11-15 5-9 7-11
22-18 18-14 22-18
15-22 9-18 11-16---B
25-18 22-15 27-23
12-16 10-19 3-7
29-25 24-15 26-22
9-13 8-12 7-10---C.
26-22---A 23-19 Diagram.
16-20 4-8
30-26 25-22
BLACK

WHITE
White to Play and Draw

W:W32,31,28,23,22,21,19,18,15:B20,16,13,12,10,8,6,2,1.

A---If you still think it can't happen to you, look at these figures showing how the great William Strickland, blindfolded, polished off a victim while playing six opponents simultaneously! Continue at A: 25-22,16-20, 24-19, 5-9, 28-24, 8-11, 32-28---1, 4-8, 19-15óB, 10-19, 23-16, 6-10, 26-23, 1-5, 30-26, 9-14, 18-9, 5-14, 22-18^ 14-17, 21-14, 10-17, 26-22, 17-26, 31-22, 8-12, 23-19; then the finish, with: 3-8*, 18-14, 7-10*, 14-7, 11-15*, 19-10, 12-19, 24-15, 2-25, and black wins.

B---The loser. From here to the end, Strickland kept his win well in hand, never giving his opponent a chance to draw. The correct play for a draw at B is 30-25, 10-14, 18-15, 11-18, 22-15, 1-5, 15-10, 6-15, 19-10, 14-18, 23-14, 9-18, 26-22, 7-14, 22-15, 2-6, 24-19, 14-18, 27-24, 20-27, 31-24, 6-9, 15-11, 8-15, 19-10, 9-14, 10-6, 13-17, 6-2,17-22, 2-6, 22-29, 6-10, 5-9, 10-17, 9-13,17-14, 18-22, 14-17, 22-26, 17-22, 26-30, 24-19, 30-25, 22-26, 25-22, etc. F. Tescheleit vs. J. M. Dallas.

C---This is where Jordan fell. One would never suspect that white had a Brooklyn in the offing. At the time this game was played, Jordan was champion of England, and the fact that he missed a draw by 31-27 proves how games may be drawn by stroke strategy that otherwise would be hopeless. In short, Jordan missed the Brooklyn idea and lost the game."

1---30-25 is perhaps a better move here---Ed.

2---This move is fine, but 6-9 would have been at least as good---Ed.

Can you find the solution, or will your resolution be delayed? When you're ready, cross over the bridge to Read More to see the snappy solution.



Solution

"Continue: 31-27*, 2-7, 28-24*, 7-11, 22-17*, 13-22, 18-14*, 10-17, 21-14, 11-18, 14-10, 6-15, 23-14, 16-23, 27-4, 20-27, 32-23; a draw. James P. Reed."

01/14/12 - Category: Books - Printer friendly version
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