The Checker Maven

Zig-Zag

The term zig-zag is of uncertain origin. It seems to have first appeared in print in a Dutch publication in 1706; it appeared in English around 1728. It is probably a variation of the German word "zickzack." This word evidently referred to castle fortifications, which were often built in a zig-zag form; the word "zick-zack" was also used in English, along with "zic-zac," until "zig-zag" seemed to become the standard--- if such things really have standards.

Today's checker problem definitely has a zig-zag nature, as can be seen in the diagram below.

BLACK

WHITE
White to Play and Win

W:W22,26,30,32:B9,13,17,19.

This is supposed to be an easy problem, but in fact it requires some thought. Can you make those pieces zig and zag to a White win? Give it a try and then zig-zag your mouse over to Read More to see the solution.



Solution

The win in the main line is fairly straightforward, but in note B, Black complicates things a little.

32-27 9-14---A 27-23 19-24 22-18 17-21---B 18x9 White Wins.

A---17-21 22-18 13-17 26-22 17x26 30x16 White Wins.

B---24-27 18x9 27-31 26-22 17x26 9-6 13-17 6-2 17-22 2-7 31-27 7-11 27x18 30x14 White Wins.

07/30/11 - Category: Problems - Printer friendly version
You can email the Webmaster with comments on this article.