The Checker Maven

Dunne It Again

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We found the above inspirational poster very appropriate to our weekly column, for doesn't checkers mirror life in so many ways? Trust in our abilities, a belief in our capacity to succeed and to do what we have to do; these attributes apply both to the game of checkers and to life in general.

Someone who has Dunne-it before and now has Dunne-it again is our old checker friend, F. Dunne. We've seen his studies and positions before, and today we have another one that is subtle and interesting. It's our Checker School entry for this month.

F. DUNNE
BLACK
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WHITE
White to Play and Draw

W:W30,23,22,21,20,19:B15,14,13,12,10,4.

Can you solve this and find the White draw? There's another inspirational saying from none other than Henry Ford: "Whether you think you can or think you can't, you're right." Trust in yourself, think positive, and click on Read More to see the solution, sample games, and explanatory notes.20050904-symbol.gif

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06/24/17 - Printer friendly version
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From Corner to Corner

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From one corner to the other, boxers chase their opponents, hoping to land the winning blow. The fighter above seems ready to come out of her corner and do whatever it takes to lay out her opponent.

But some fighters win by decision rather than the quick knockout. That fact, and the title of today's column, provide broad hints toward the solution of the problem shown below.

WHITE
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BLACK
Black to Play and Win

B:W31,29,12,K2,K1:B22,K15,K14,K10,3.

Before you begin, let's make note of a couple of things. First, White has two kings more or less entrapped in or near the Black double corner. Second, White has a man on 12 that is immobilized. Finally, White holds a bridge position on 29 and 31, but the man on 29 is immobile, and if White moves the man on 31, Black can stop it with 15-19 and then win it a few moves later.

So what can White do? Not much except perhaps shuffle around in the double corner. Black has a tremendous mobility advantage. That usually spells a win. The question is how to make it happen.

We'll repeat our hints. This is not a quick knockout; to win, Black must patiently apply technique. And again, keep in mind the title of our study. It's by no means an easy fight. This one is championship class.

Don't let this one knock you out; win the decision, then land your mouse on Read More to check your solution.20050904-symbol.gif

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06/17/17 - Printer friendly version
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London Bridge

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One of Great Britain's most famous landmarks, London Bridge, has changed a lot over the years. The sketch above depicts London Bridge as it supposedly looked near the end of the 17th century. It's a far cry from today's London Bridge, and we suspect that's just as well.

One thing that hasn't changed over the years, though, is the Bridge Position in our game of checkers. Certainly, more variations and interesting problems have been published, but at heart a bridge has the same fundamental characteristics as ever.

Of course, sometimes a bridge is a win, sometimes a loss, and oft-times a draw. It all depends. In the following position, a rather unornamented bridge turns out to be a loss for the bridging side.

WHITE
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BLACK
Black to Play and Win

B:W32,30,K19:B27,23,K22,9.

Is this a bridge that you can cross, by finding the Black win? We'd rate the difficulty as medium; if you're familiar with bridges, you won't have any trouble with it; and if you're not familiar with these positions, this is a good time to bridge that gap. When you're ready, click on Read More to see the solution.20050904-symbol.gif

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06/10/17 - Printer friendly version
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At A Stroke

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We didn't think they could do it, but our intrepid Research Department managed to come up with another meaning for the word stroke, to wit: at a stroke, with the meaning of "all at once," such as, "we solved a dozen checker problems at a stroke."

That would be quite a feat, indeed, and of course you just know we're going to present a stroke problem to kick off the month of June.

BLACK
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WHITE
White to Play and Win

W:W23,22,K21,18,16,15,11,10,7:BK30,K29,27,26,K20,19,9,3,1.

Can you solve this one "at a stroke" or will it take you longer? Are your powers of visualization up to the challenge? If you find the position difficult, we refer you to the quote at the beginning of the article.

When you've determined the correct moves, clicking on Read More will bring you to the solution--- at a stroke.20050904-symbol.gif

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06/03/17 - Printer friendly version
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