The Checker Maven

The Single(s) Corner

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Not what you expected, was it?

No, The Checker Maven isn't about to write about dating sites or singles' bars.

Singles? Vinyl? 45 RPM? Anyone else remember those? We'll bet many of our readers do. There was the three-minute long "hit" on the "A" side and something obscure on the "B" side, which most of us didn't listen to more than once or twice.

Today we're scratching into, you guessed it, the Single Corner opening. Here's the run-up to the diagram below.

11-15 22-18 15x22 25x18 8-11 29-25 4-8 24-20 10-15 25-22 12-16 21-17 8-12 17-13 7-10 27-24 9-14 18x9 5x14 32-27 3-7 30-25---A 16-19 23x16 12x19 27-23 (see diagram)

A---Loses. 24-19 draws. If you want more of a challenge, stop here and show the Black win.

WHITE
20150128-singlescorner.png
BLACK
Black to Play and Win

B:W31,28,26,25,24,23,22,20,13:B19,15,14,11,10,7,6,2,1.

Left at this stage, the problem isn't especially hard. As in traditional singles, it's the first move-- the "A" side, if you will--- that counts. Take a spin at it, then drop the mouse on Read More to see how your solution sounds.20050904-symbol.gif

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02/28/15 - Printer friendly version
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Traffic Jam

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Paradise has a price. A surprising fact is that Honolulu traffic is second only to Los Angeles in the United States. The photo above tells it all as we see an all too common jam-up on the H1 highway.

We've just given you a big hint, by the way, to the solution of today's Checker School problems. And here's another hint: solve the second one first. These aren't especially easy, so be patient and persevere, just as you would have to do in a traffic jam.

T. LEAR - T. POOL
WHITE
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BLACK
Black to Play and Win

B:W21,K15,13,12,K8:BK22,K16,14,6,3.

D. KIRKWOOD
WHITE
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BLACK
Black to Play and Win

B:WK28,17,12,K1:BK27,K18,K9,3.

Don't get yourself in a jam; solve the problems and then jam that mouse down on Read More to see the solutions, sample games, and explanatory notes.20050904-symbol.gif

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02/21/15 - Printer friendly version
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Presidents' Day

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We wonder--- how many readers can recall the origin of Presidents' Day?

The older among us will recall the February 22 celebration of Washington's Birthday, and perhaps the February 12 celebration of Lincoln's Birthday in some states such as Illinois. Observation of Washington's Birthday goes back to the 1800s, in fact, becoming a Federal holiday in 1879.

But at some point in the 1960s a movement began for more three-day weekends, and finally in 1971 Washington's Birthday began to officially be observed on the third Monday in February. By the 1980s, the name "Presidents' Day" was in common use.

The holiday is now intended to honor all of our Presidents. And that points out one thing about America: we're all free to like or dislike our President as we see fit--- and be as open as we want about it--- but the Office of the President deserves the greatest of respect.

Today we're featuring a checker problem derived from a book published back in 1886.

WHITE
20150107-presday.png
BLACK
Black to Play and Win

B:WK26,24,20:BK27,12,K9.

Naturally, we challenge you to solve this problem, but first, can you quickly say who was President in 1886? Not so easy, is it?

When you've solved the problem (or not) and named the President (or not), click on Read More to see the solutions.20050904-symbol.gif

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02/14/15 - Printer friendly version
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Another Easy Stroke

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We checked into our past columns, and we haven't published something called an "easy stroke" since 2010, and to find another, you'd have to go back to 2005.

Every five years just doesn't seem like quite enough, does it? Today, it's surely time for an "easy" stroke, and we offer you one below.

BLACK
20141219-anothereasy.png
WHITE
White to Play and Win

W:W23,22,18,17,14:B26,K25,K24,10,7,6.

What's that you say? It doesn't look "easy" at all? Actually, if you find the "key" move, the rest pretty much plays itself. Well, pretty much!

Tap this one home ... find that first little move, and then click on Read More to check your solution.20050904-symbol.gif

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02/07/15 - Printer friendly version
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